Living From Your LifeCore

by | Oct 1, 2018 | Self-Leadership, YouLeadU | 0 comments

“Everything rises and falls on leadership. You, as the leader, the point person, the CEO, the Big Guy, the Big Dog — however you prefer to think of yourself — you and you alone can provide the inspirational leadership your church requires to move to the next level. This cannot be abdicated or delegated. This cannot be reassigned or made the product of a task force. You are the inspirational leader. Now, go inspire your people!”

Great, I thought. There are days I cannot inspire my dog to go outside. There are days when I cannot inspire myself to get moving in the right direction. How in the world am I going to inspire others?

Some people have an attractional aura which draws people to them and makes them want to do great things, to take great risks, to achieve a state of amazingness just because the inspirational leader said it needed to be done.

Few are the leaders who possess the personal magnetism to empower others toward awesomeness.

Even so, one of my LifeCore — my top-level values — is Inspiring Leadership. Oxymoron anyone?

Inspirational Leadership

The CEO of one of the hospitals in the Houston Medical Center entered the giant main-floor lobby. He immediately began moving with deliberate direction to each employee on that floor. He called every person by name. He asked personal questions unique to each of them. It was as if each man and woman, regardless of position, was his best friend. He left everyone with a smile.

I’m not that guy. You probably are not either.

I couldn’t become that kind of person if I had a full-time charismatician on retainer.

However, I noticed something I have pondered since this chance observation years ago. That leader made everything in those encounters about the other person. His inspiring leadership was not about making him look and feel good, but about making each employee look and feel good. No wonder he was so inspiring.

I will never enjoy his charisma, but I can employ his methodology.

People are endlessly fascinated with themselves. If we want to lead them, serve them, or work productively with them, we must connect with them. How do we do that? Here is a suggestion: Pay attention to them.

Pay Attention to People

A guy drives a Subaru with an EARTH bumper sticker. He wears Merrell hiking shoes and Patagonia outerwear. He has a Fourteener tattoo. How do you think he spends his Saturdays? Here’s a wild guess: He’s not sitting home watching a Netflix marathon of Riverdale. What do you think he wants to talk about come Monday? What would be a good question to ask him?

If you want to connect more deeply, move beyond curiosity to interest. Learn to like the things they like.

That is inspirational leadership.

To inspire is to fill someone with the desire to do something. It is about helping others believe in their God-given abilities and their developing talents to the point they take risks which garner rewards and build confidence. Inspirational leadership is not about your ability to impress others, but to help others impress themselves.

Inspirational leadership is demonstrated by breathing courage into fearful souls.

Breathe Courage into Fearful Souls

Winston Churchill talked England and the Allies through World War II. He determined that, as far as it depended on him, he would encourage and inspire his countrymen and compatriots toward greatness and victory.

How could you do the same thing at home? At work? At church?

Our Baby Girl (who recently celebrated her 26th birthday) just took the Texas Bar Exam. I began writing daily encouragement to her over two months ago as she began working through her prep course. This was the first note as we began counting down the days to the completion of the bar exam and the beginning of her adventures in lawyerdom:

“One day,” she said.

One Day she would invest herself in the hard work of providing safety and freedom for the little ones. One Day is now one day closer.

Today is Day One.

Three years of the paper chase behind her, one final hurdle remains before the lifestyle of liberation fully begins. Day by day, destiny draws closer. Day by day, details deepen into knowledge. Day by day, the final exam inches nearer.

“One day,” she promised.

Today, that day is one day closer. One day soon, a promise made becomes a promise kept.

Day One is here.

Love you,

Dad

PS: 68 days to go

  • What are your core values?
  • What guides your decision-making process at the deepest level?
  • How do you choose what to say yes to and what to decline?

Your LifeCore gives you the freedom to be who you really are. Your LifeCore provides you with the articulation of what you feel most passionate about.

A Younique 48-Hour Life Plan provides a one-page snapshot which declares your LifeCall (personal life mission), your LifeCore, your LifeSteps (this season’s role and resource emphases), and your LifeScore (how you measure progress). Your Life Plan gives you clarity for where your life is going and how you will get there.

Your Life Plan will empower you to maximize your life story.

Let’s get started on the next chapter of your life story.

david@www.davidgbowman.com.php72-35.phx1-2.websitetestlink.com

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